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LIFE: Neonatal Resuscitation Training (ETAT+ NR). App

Nuffield Department of Medicine, (2019)


Learn the ETAT+ guidelines on how to resuscitate a newborn baby who is born not breathing in this exciting 3D simulation training app. Navigate around a virtual reality hospital, find the equipment you need and quiz yourself with interactive quizzes, multiple-choice questions (MCQs) and perform simulated procedures. In this simulated scenario, you are faced with a baby who is born not breathing and have to use your clinical skills to follow the ETAT + guidelines and save the baby's life. You are working against the clock and must select the correct medical equipment and carry out the key life-saving steps needed. ETAT + guidelines for the management of paediatric emergencies are currently used for training healthcare professionals in Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania, Sierra Leone and Myanmar and are supported by the UK's Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. LIFE (Life-saving Instruction for Emergencies) is a new smartphone and virtual reality (VR) medical simulation training platform for teaching healthcare workers in Africa and low-resource settings how to save lives using a fun and challenging 3D game. LIFE allows nurses, doctors, medical students, trainees and healthcare workers who want to learn key resus skills on their own smartphones, to enter a realistic 3D hospital environment using the latest game-engine technology to try out their skills on simulated patients.
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=uk.a...


Managing Sexual Violence against Aid Workers: prevention, preparedness, response and aftercare. Summary Brief

European Interagency Security Forum, (2019)


Managing Sexual Violence against Aid Workers aims to support aid agencies in preventing, being prepared for and responding to incidents of sexual violence against their staff. It is intended as a good practice guide to help strengthen existing processes and support organisations as they set up their own protocols. This guide is aimed at anyone with a responsibility for staff care, safety and security, as well as anyone involved in processes aimed at preventing or responding to incidents of sexual violence against staff, such as security focal points, HR staff, project and programmes staff, and first responders to incidents of sexual violence within an aid organisation.
https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/re...


Policy guidelines: Child and adolescent mental health

Department of Health, South Africa, (2013)


The guidelines begin with an overview of the determinants of mental health among children and adolescents before reviewing related South African policies and legislation. The document then discusses strategies to build skills among caregivers, teachers and other frontline providers of mental health interventions as well as those for counselling professionals. The guidelines conclude by identifying priority areas for mental health services among children and adolescents, including the prevention of child and substance abuse as well as services for those living with intellectual disabilities
http://www.doh.gov.za/docs/policy/2013/child_menta...


Field Action Guide for Psychosocial Assessment of Children and Families in Emergencies

Regional Emergency Psychosocial Support Network & UNICEF EAPRO, (2005)


This field action guide focuses on the first psychosocial assessment to be conducted just after a calamity strikes or just after a major event in an ongoing armed conflict. While it is necessary to update that initial assessment as the emergency situation evolves through the different phases of recovery (briefly outlined in the “phase chart”), this mini book is meant to guide the formation of a team to assess the psychosocial as well as physical needs of children, their families and the communities and then the recommendations the team makes for ensuing support.
http://mhpss.net/wp-content/uploads/group-document...


Managing Sexual Violence against Aid Workers: prevention, preparedness, response and aftercare

European Interagency Security Forum, (2019)


Managing Sexual Violence against Aid Workers aims to support aid agencies in preventing, being prepared for and responding to incidents of sexual violence against their staff. It is intended as a good practice guide to help strengthen existing processes and support organisations as they set up their own protocols. This guide is aimed at anyone with a responsibility for staff care, safety and security, as well as anyone involved in processes aimed at preventing or responding to incidents of sexual violence against staff, such as security focal points, HR staff, project and programmes staff, and first responders to incidents of sexual violence within an aid organisation.
https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/re...


The safe delivery app

Maternity foundation; University of Copenhagen; University of Southern Denmark, (2019)


The Safe Delivery App is a smartphone application that provides skilled birth attendants with direct and instant access to evidence-based and up-to-date clinical guidelines on Basic Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care. The App leverages the growing ubiquity of mobile phones to provide life-saving information and guidance through easy-to-understand animated instruction videos, action cards and drug lists. It can serve as a training tool both in pre- and in-service training, and equips birth attendants even in the most remote areas with a powerful on-the-job reference tool. Accessed 3rd April 2019
https://www.maternity.dk/safe-delivery-app/


How to transform a social norm

UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation , (2018)



https://www.unfpa.org/sites/default/files/pub-pdf/...


Robson Classification: Implementation Manual

World Health Organization, (2017)


In 2015, WHO proposed the use of the Robson classification (also known as the 10-group classification) as a global standard for assessing, monitoring and comparing caesarean section rates both within healthcare facilities and between them. The system classifies all women into one of 10 categories that are mutually exclusive and, as a set, totally comprehensive. The categories are based on 5 basic obstetric characteristics that are routinely collected in all maternities (parity, number of foetuses, previous caesarean section, onset of labour, gestational age, and fetal presentation).
https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/2...


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