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International Standards of Drug Use Prevention

World Health Organization (WHO); United Nations Office on Drug and Crime UNODC, (2019)


2nd revised edition. Accessed Apri. 17, 2019 Prevention strategies based on scientific evidence working with families, schools, and communities can ensure that children and youth, especially the most marginalized and poor, grow and stay healthy and safe into adulthood and old age. For every dollar spent on prevention, at least ten can be saved in future health, social and crime costs.
https://www.unodc.org/documents/prevention/standar...


Strong Families Programme

United Nations Office on Drug and Crime UNODC, (2019)


The Strong Families Programme was developed and piloted in Afghanistan thanks to the generous support of the US-INL. To date, this programme has further been piloted in Central America, Central and West Asia, East and West Africa thanks to the support of Sweden, France and the US
https://www.unodc.org/documents/drug-prevention-an...


Publications on prevention of drug use and treatment, care and rehabilitation of drug dependence

United Nations Office on Drug and Crime UNODC, (2019)


Here you can download brochures, posters and leaflets for the prevention of drug use and treatment, care and rehabilitation programmes
https://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/drug-prevention-and...


Management of physical health conditions in adults with severe mental disorders

World Health Organization WHO, (2018)


The global burden of disease due to mental disorders continues to rise, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). In addition to causing a large proportion of morbidity, mental disorders – especially severe mental disorders (SMD) – are linked with poorer health outcomes and increased mortality. SMD are defined as a group of conditions that include moderate to severe depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. People with SMD have a two to three times higher average mortality compared to the general population, which translates to a 10-20 year reduction in life expectancy. While people with SMD do have higher rates of death due to unnatural causes (accidents, homicide, or suicide) than the general population, the majority of deaths amongst people with SMD are attributable to physical health conditions, both non-communicable and communicable.
apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/275718/97...


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