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NEW WHO Report on Surveillance of Antibiotic Consumption

World Health Organization WHO, (2018)


2016-2018 Early implementation, This report presents 2015 data on the consumption of systemic antibiotics from 65 countries and areas, contributing to our understanding of how antibiotics are used in these countries. In addition, the report documents early efforts of the World Health Organization (WHO) and participating countries to monitor antimicrobial consumption, describes the WHO global methodology for data collection, and highlights the challenges and future steps in monitoring antimicrobial consumption.
http://www.who.int/medicines/areas/rational_use/wh...


The Core Elements of Human Antibiotic Stewardship Programs in Resource-Limited Settings: National and Hospital Levels

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC, (2018)


Formularies are lists of antibiotics that are suggested for certain healthcare settings. In developing a recommended formulary, countries should consider the needs of patients and facilities where they receive care. For example, clinicians in rural or primary health centers may need wide access to first-line antibiotics (e.g., penicillin, ampicillin, TMP-SMX), but last resort antibiotics such as carbapenems or colistin might be limited to tertiary care hospitals. Efforts to create antibiotic formularies may be linked to efforts within countries to create or update essential medicine lists (EML).
https://www.cdc.gov/antibiotic-use/healthcare/pdfs...


Anthropological and socioeconomic factors contributing to global antimicrobial resistance: a univariate and multivariable analysis

P. Collignon, J.J.Beggs, T.R. Walsh, et al., (2018)


The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 2, ISSUE 9, Pe398-e405, September 01, 2018. Reduction of antibiotic consumption will not be sufficient to control antimicrobial resistance because contagion—the spread of resistant strains and resistance genes—seems to be the dominant contributing factor. Improving sanitation, increasing access to clean water, and ensuring good governance, as well as increasing public health-care expenditure and better regulating the private health sector are all necessary to reduce global antimicrobial resistance.
https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanplh/article/...


Medicines Catalog August 2018

Global Drug Facility, Eds.: World Health Organization WHO, Stop TB, (2018)


The new, all oral, 20-month MDR-TB regimens range from US $1,600* (using bedaquiline and linezolid for 6 months and levofloxacin as the fluoroquinolone) to US $2,100* (using linezolid for 12 months and moxifloxacin as the fluoroquinolone.
http://stoptb.org/assets/documents/gdf/Medicines_C...


UPDATING NATIONAL ESSENTIAL MEDICINE LISTS: A STEP-BY-STEP ADVOCACY GUIDE

Eds.: Management Sciences for Health (MSH), (2016)


This guide provides national stakeholders and advocates with information and guidance to update the national essential medicines list to include a new commodity, a new indication, or a new formulation based on the available evidence and based on country need and disease burden. While the actors, timeline, and process may vary from country to country, this guide presents the broad steps involved in revising an EML for any health commodity. Additional resources and a glossary are included to provide supplemental information and to clarify key terms.
https://www.msh.org/resources/updating-national-es...


Quantification des intrants de santé : supplément SRMNI - Prévision de la consommation de produits sélectionnés pour la santé reproductive, maternelle, néonatale et infantile

Eds.: JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc., et Management Sciences for Health, (2016)


Soumis à l’Agence des États-Unis pour le développement international par le programme SIAPS (Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services ou Programme des systèmes pour l’amélioration de l’accès aux produits et services pharmaceutiques). Arlington, VA : Management Sciences for Health. Soumis à l’UNICEF par JSI, Arlington, VA : JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc. Ce guide aidera les gestionnaires de programmes, les prestataires de service et les experts techniques lorsqu'ils réaliseront une quantification des besoins en intrants pour les 13 produits indispensables à la santé reproductive, maternelle, néonatale et infantile, dont la priorité a été établie par la Commission des Nations Unies pour les produits qui sauvent la vie des femmes et des enfants. Ce supplément à la quantification ne saurait être utilisé sans son guide principal – Quantification of Health Commodities: A Guide to Forecasting and Supply Planning for Procurement (Quantification des intrants de santé : un guide pour la prévision des achats et la planification des approvisionnements). * Ce supplément décrit les étapes à suivre pour la prévision de la consommation de ces intrants, en l’absence de données sur la consommation ou les services. Ensuite, afin de compléter la quantification, les utilisateurs doivent se référer au guide principal de quantification pour l’étape de planification de l’approvisionnement.
https://www.msh.org/resources/quantification-of-he...


Quantification of Health Commodities: RMNCH Supplement - Forecasting Consumption of Select Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health Commodities

Eds.: JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc., and Management Sciences for Health, (2016)


Submitted to the US Agency for International Development by the Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program. Arlington, VA: Management Sciences for Health. Submitted to the United Nations Children’s Fund by JSI, Arlington, VA: JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc. This guide will assist program managers, service providers, and technical experts when conducting a quantification of commodity needs for the 13 reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health commodities prioritized by the UN Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children. This quantification supplement should be used with the main guide—Quantification of Health Commodities: A Guide to Forecasting and Supply Planning for Procurement. * This supplement describes the steps in forecasting consumption of these supplies when consumption and service data are not available; after which, to complete the quantification, the users should refer to the main quantification guide for the supply planning step.
https://www.msh.org/resources/quantification-of-he...


IMPROVING MEDICINES ACCESS AND USE FOR CHILD HEALTH: A GUIDE TO DEVELOPING INTERVENTIONS

Ross-Degnan, D., Vialle-Valentin, C., and Briggs, J. , Eds.: USAID, SIAPS (Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services), (2015)


Submitted to the US Agency for International Development by the Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program. This manual provides a framework to identify problems and design interventions to improve access to and use of medicines for children. It is a resource for both health policy makers and health system managers and presents a structured approach to the steps introduced in the framework in the context of child health.
https://www.msh.org/sites/msh.org/files/ch_interve...


Quantification of Health Commodities - A Guide to Forecasting and Supply Planning for Procurement

Eds.: USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, Task Order 4, (2014)


The USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, Task Order 4, developed this guide for quantifying health commodities; it will assist technical advisors, program managers, warehouse managers, procurement officers, and service providers in (1) estimating the total commodity needs and costs for successful implementation of national health program strategies and goals, (2) identifying the funding needs and gaps for procuring the required commodities, and (3) planning procurements and shipment delivery schedules to ensure a sustained and effective supply of health commodities. The step-by-step approach to quantification presented in this guide is complemented by a set of product-specific companion pieces that include detailed instructions for forecasting consumption of antiretroviral drugs, HIV test kits, antimalarial drugs, and laboratory supplies.
http://apps.who.int/medicinedocs/documents/s21547e...


Health Systems in Action: An eHandbook for Leaders and Managers - CHAPTER 8 - Managing Medicines And Health Products

Malcolm Clark; Andy Barraclough, Eds.: Management Sciences for Health, (2010)


Full eHandbook under: http://www.msh.org/resources/health-systems-in-action-an-ehandbook-for-leaders-and-managers Effective supply management has the potential to make a powerful contribution to the reliable availability of essential medicines, which are a crucial part of the delivery of highquality health care services. Because medicines are costly and poor management so often results in waste, good supply management is also crucial to the cost-effectiveness of providing medicines.
https://www.msh.org/resources/managing-medicines-a...


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