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Extreme weather and disaster preparedness: 2018 cyclone preparedness lessons learnt

Bangladesh Red Crescent Society , et al., Eds.: UNHR, (2019)


Enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response. One of the most disaster-prone countries in the world, Bangladesh each year experiences a high degree of seasonal variety, including southwest monsoon and two cyclone seasons. With its long coastline on the Bay of Bengal and with a landscape consisting of flat deltaic plains and sandy hills, Cox´s Bazaar is highly exposed to natural hazards and extreme weather, including cyclones, torrential rain, landslides, flash floods, storm surges and extreme temperatures. The 2018 Cyclone Preparedness Lessons Learnt Exercise aims to capture and analyse knowledge acquired by humanitarian actors during their cyclone preparedness efforts and operations in the Rohingya refugee camps during the 2018 cyclone seasons. The purpose is to provide a reference document for planning for future cyclone seasons, support evidence-based advocacy, and identify gaps in preparedness which need to be addressed in advance of the 2019 cyclone seasons. The report focuses on lessons learnt in the refugee camps, not host communities Large File: 17 MB
https://reliefweb.int/report/bangladesh/extreme-we...


Geo-informatics Applications in Disaster Management (Facilitator’s Guide)

The Republic of the Union of Myanmar, Ministry of Social Welfare, Relief and Resettlement, Relief and Resettlement Department, (2016)


This module carries pre-training entry level assessment as well as hands on exercise manual on Geographic Information Systems, Remote Sensing, Geographic Positioning System (GPS) and some applications of these technologies on Disaster Risk Management (DRM) especially for hazard mapping, monitoring and risk assessment module as well as the damage assessment module. Practical manual developed using open source products like Quantum GIS , RStudio, Google Earth Pro and Google Earth Engine.
This module can also can be used by other training facilitators, non-technical professionals and selflearners as well. However, it is strongly recommended that training participants and self-learners already have some basic knowledge of Computer Basic, Geoinformatics and disaster management.
No publication year indicated.
Original file: 29,5 MB
http://unhabitat.org.mm/wp-content/uploads/2018/06...


Geo-informatics Applications in Disaster Management (Facilitator’s Guide) (Burmese Version)

The Republic of the Union of Myanmar, Ministry of Social Welfare, Relief and Resettlement (MSWRR), Relief and Resettlement Department, (2016)


This module carries pre-training entry level assessment as well as hands on exercise manual on Geographic Information Systems, Remote Sensing, Geographic Positioning System (GPS) and some applications of these technologies on Disaster Risk Management (DRM) especially for hazard mapping, monitoring and risk assessment module as well as the damage assessment module. Practical manual developed using open source products like Quantum GIS , RStudio, Google Earth Pro and Google Earth Engine.
This module can also can be used by other training facilitators, non-technical professionals and selflearners as well. However, it is strongly recommended that training participants and self-learners already have some basic knowledge of Computer Basic, Geoinformatics and disaster management.
No publication year indicated.
Original file: 30,5 MB
http://unhabitat.org.mm/wp-content/uploads/2018/06...


Indonesia: Disaster Management Reference Handbook

Center for Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance, (2018)


The Indonesian government has reformed its laws, policies, and institutions to better manage disaster risk since the significant 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. The Government of Indonesia now has contingency plans for every disaster-prone city which identifies its vulnerabilities, outlines the relief response, and builds overall preparedness. In 2007, the government introduced a disaster management bill that incorporated disaster management prevention into disaster management response. In 2008, Indonesia created the National Disaster Management Agency (Badan Nasional Penanggulangan Bencana, BNPB). The new shift led to the strengthening of the country’s disaster management agency, and the addition of district branches and representatives. Despite the progress made, more work is needed at the local level as well as integration of disaster risk reduction in government departments.11 Under Indonesia’s 2007 Disaster Management law, provincial and district administrations are mandated to head disaster management during a crisis.
https://www.cfe-dmha.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket...


Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction for Sustainable Development: A Guidebook for the Asia-Pacific

United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), (2017)


Lack of satisfactory progress in mainstreaming disaster risk reduction within development is attributed to various factors. One of the important factor that is often not much appreciated is the inadequate comprehension of mainstreaming and the absence of clear, cogent and practical guidelines, tools and techniques for mainstreaming DRR within development. This Guidebook helps to tackle this challenge by providing strategic and practical guidelines on how to mainstream disaster risk reduction into their policies plans and programmes across key sectors. It discusses strategic approaches towards risk resilient development in the Asia-Pacific region and demonstrates how to operationalize them using examples from various countries in the region. These guidelines can be adopted by countries according to their specific contexts, resources and capacities.
https://www.unescap.org/sites/default/files/public...


Handbook for a School-based Risk Reduction Initiative

International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), (2015)


This handbook presents basic content and tips for implementing a school-based risk reduction programme. It is organised into five modules: its importance; approach and process; activities to benefit children up to five years old; activities for students aged 5–17; and activities for young people and volunteers aged 17–24.
A generic framework for school-based risk reduction initiatives is illustrated in a diagram on p.10. The Comprehensive School Safety framework suggests a series of continuing activities that include: identifying the hazards in and around a school; conducting drills; preparing contingency and disaster management plans by involving parents, teachers and students; and building on the capacities of an institution and individuals to cope with the challenges during an unforeseen event. It also consists of three pillars: safe learning facilities; school disaster management; and risk reduction and resilience education.
http://www.rcrc-resilience-southeastasia.org/wp-co...


National strategy on the management of disaster and climate induced internal displacement (NSMDCIID)

Bangladesh, Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief (MoDMR), (2015)


This strategy has been developed with a view to managing climate-induced internal displacement (CIID) in a comprehensive and rights-based manner. It is part of the action plan for the Government of Bangladesh (GoB) to implement the Sendai Framework.
The strategy focuses solely on internal displacements caused by climate-related disasters and not cross-border displacement issues. It aims to chalk out a comprehensive strategy covering all three phases of displacements: (i) pre-displacement; (ii) displacement phase; and (iii) post-displacement. The multidimensional characteristics of the Strategy require participation of all relevant ministries with a target to integrate the concerns of CIIDPs into the existing programmes of all these ministries.
https://www.preventionweb.net/files/46732_nsmdciid...


Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030

United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR), (2015)


The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 outlines seven clear targets and four priorities for action to prevent new and reduce existing disaster risks: (i) Understanding disaster risk; (ii) Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk; (iii) Investing in disaster reduction for resilience and; (iv) Enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response, and to "Build Back Better" in recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction.
It aims to achieve the substantial reduction of disaster risk and losses in lives, livelihoods and health and in the economic, physical, social, cultural and environmental assets of persons, businesses, communities and countries over the next 15 years.
https://www.unisdr.org/files/43291_sendaiframework...


Emergency response framework, 2nd ed.

World Health Organization (WHO), (2017)


The purpose of this Emergency Response Framework (ERF) is to clarify WHO’s roles and responsibilities in this regard and to provide a common approach for its work in emergencies. Ultimately, the ERF requires WHO to act with urgency and predictability to best serve and be accountable to populations affected by emergencies.
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/25...


Guide for Emergency Preparedness and Correct Action in Emergency Situations

Federal Office of Civil Protection and Disaster Assistance (BBK), (2017)


Stay­ing sa­fe in spi­te of a di­sas­ter. What can you do for your sa­fe­ty in the event of a di­sas­ter? In spring 2013, af­ter weeks of rain, who­le are­as of southern, eas­tern and nor­thern Ger­ma­ny we­re be­set by ca­ta­stro­phic floods. Sett­le­ments va­nis­hed in the floods up to the roofs of the hou­ses, tens of thou­sands of emer­gen­cy per­son­nel and vol­un­teers strug­gled against the wa­ter with sand­bags. Vil­la­ges and parts of towns had to be eva­cua­ted, and the ci­ti­zens we­re on­ly ab­le to ta­ke the es­sen­ti­als with them. Di­sas­ters are part of li­fe. Al­most eve­ry day, we can read about di­sas­ters and lar­ges­ca­le emer­gen­cies in a va­rie­ty of me­dia and see the images of de­struc­ti­on and suf­fe­ring. The­se are not just ma­jor di­sas­ters which af­fect lar­ge are­as for a long ti­me. Lo­cal tor­ren­ti­al rain, a se­ve­re storm, an elec­tric power break­down re­sul­ting from such a storm, or a hou­se fi­re can trig­ger a ve­ry per­so­nal di­sas­ter for each in­di­vi­du­al, each fa­mi­ly, which has to be over­co­me. Ta­ke the ti­me to con­tem­pla­te your per­so­nal emer­gen­cy plan­ning. This bro­chu­re aims to help you to de­ve­lop your per­so­nal pre­pa­red­ness plan. The brochure is also available in different languages: https://www.bbk.bund.de/DE/Service/Publikationen/Broschuerenfaltblaetter/Ratgeber_node.html
https://www.bbk.bund.de/SharedDocs/Downloads/BBK/D...


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