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NEW RD Congo - Ituri, Nord Kivu : Etat de la riposte à l’épidémie de la maladie à virus Ebola ( au 17 Septembre 2018)

Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, World Health Organization, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, (2018)



https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/re...


NEW IOM DR Congo Migration Health Division: Ebola Response - North Kivu Situation Report 3 (01 -15 September 2018)

International Organization for Migration IOM, (2018)


Population Mobility Mapping (PMM) and Flow Monitoring (FMP) at border-crossings and in the affected province Points of Entry (POE) surveillance (health screening, risk communication, hand washing and hygiene promotion) Cross-border coordination between DRC, Republic of Uganda (Uganda) and Republic of Rwanda (Rwanda)
https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/re...


NEW Integrating palliative care and symptom relief into responses to humanitarian emergencies and crises: a WHO guide

World Health Organization WHO, (2018)


Humanitarian emergencies and crises (Humanitarian emergencies and crises) are large-scale events that may result in the breakdown of health care systems and society, forced displacement, death, and physical, psychological, social and spiritual suffering on a massive scale. Current responses to Humanitarian emergencies and crises rightfully focus on saving lives, but for both ethical and medical reasons, the prevention and relief of pain, as well as other physical and psychological symptoms, social and spiritual distress, also are imperative. Therefore, palliative care, should be integrated into responses to Humanitarian emergencies and crises. The principles of humanitarianism and impartiality require that all patients receive care and should never be abandoned for any reason, even if they are dying. Thus, there is significant overlap in the principles and mission of palliative care and humanitarianism: relief of suffering; respect for the dignity of all people; support for basic needs; and accompaniment during the most difficult of times
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/27...


NEW Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo 20 September 2018

World Health Organization WHO, (2018)


The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) remains active. Although substantial progress has been made to limit the spread of the disease to new areas and the situation in Mangina (Mabalako Health Zone) is stabilizing, the cities of Beni and Butembo have become the new hotspot. Since the last Disease Outbreak News (data as of 12 September), five new confirmed EVD cases were reported: four from Beni and one from Butembo health zones. All have been linked to ongoing transmission chains within these respective communities
http://www.who.int/csr/don/20-september-2018-ebola...


NEW Integrating palliative care and symptom relief into paediatrics: a WHO guide for health-care planners, implementers and managers

World Health Organization WHO, (2018)


People younger than 20 years comprise 35% of the global population and 40% of the global population of least-developed nations. The number of children - neonates, infants, children, and adolescents up to 19 years of age - who need pediatric palliative care (PPC) each year may be as high as 21 million. Another study found that almost 2.5 million children die each year with serious health related suffering and that more than 98% of these children are in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) (3). While estimates differ, there is no doubt that there is an enormous need for prevention and relief of suffering among children - for PPC.
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/27...


NEW Integrating palliative care and symptom relief into primary health care : WHO guide for planners, implementers and managers

World Health Organization WHO, (2018)


Inequality of access to palliative care and symptom relief is one of the greatest disparities in global health care (1). Currently, there is avoidable suffering on a massive scale due to lack of access to palliative care and symptom relief in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) (1). Yet basic palliative care that can prevent or relieve most suffering due to serious or life-threatening health conditions can be taught easily to generalist clinicians, can be provided in the community and requires only simple, inexpensive medicines and equipment. For these reasons, the World Health Assembly (WHA) resolved that palliative care is "an ethical responsibility of health systems"(2). Further, most patients who need palliative care are at home and prefer to remain there. Thus, it is imperative that palliative care be provided in the community as part of primary care. This document was written to assist ministries of health and health care planners, implementers and managers to integrate palliative care and symptom control into primary health care (PHC).
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/27...


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