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Réadaptation à base communautaire Guide de RBC - Module Introduction

World Health Organization (WHO), (2011)


Guide de réadaptation à base communautaire (RBC) En 2003, une Consultation internationale consacrée à l’examen de la réadaptation à base communautaire organisée à Helsinki a émis un certain nombre de recommandations essentielles. Par la suite, la RBC a été redéfinie, dans un document d’orientation conjoint de l’OIT, l’UNESCO et l’OMS, comme une stratégie faisant partie intégrante du développement communautaire général qui vise à assurer la réadaptation, l’égalité des chances et l’intégration sociale des personnes handicapées.
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/44...


Réadaptation à base communautaire Guide de RBC - Module Moyens de Subsistance

World Health Organization (WHO), (2011)


Guide de réadaptation à base communautaire (RBC) En 2003, une Consultation internationale consacrée à l’examen de la réadaptation à base communautaire organisée à Helsinki a émis un certain nombre de recommandations essentielles. Par la suite, la RBC a été redéfinie, dans un document d’orientation conjoint de l’OIT, l’UNESCO et l’OMS, comme une stratégie faisant partie intégrante du développement communautaire général qui vise à assurer la réadaptation, l’égalité des chances et l’intégration sociale des personnes handicapées.
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/44...


Réadaptation à base communautaire Guide de RBC - Module Autonomisation

World Health Organization (WHO), (2011)


Guide de réadaptation à base communautaire (RBC) En 2003, une Consultation internationale consacrée à l’examen de la réadaptation à base communautaire organisée à Helsinki a émis un certain nombre de recommandations essentielles. Par la suite, la RBC a été redéfinie, dans un document d’orientation conjoint de l’OIT, l’UNESCO et l’OMS, comme une stratégie faisant partie intégrante du développement communautaire général qui vise à assurer la réadaptation, l’égalité des chances et l’intégration sociale des personnes handicapées.
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/44...


Réadaptation à base communautaire Guide de RBC - Module Social

World Health Organization (WHO), (2011)


Guide de réadaptation à base communautaire (RBC) En 2003, une Consultation internationale consacrée à l’examen de la réadaptation à base communautaire organisée à Helsinki a émis un certain nombre de recommandations essentielles. Par la suite, la RBC a été redéfinie, dans un document d’orientation conjoint de l’OIT, l’UNESCO et l’OMS, comme une stratégie faisant partie intégrante du développement communautaire général qui vise à assurer la réadaptation, l’égalité des chances et l’intégration sociale des personnes handicapées.
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/44...


The Family and Disability in Ghana: Highlighting Gaps in Achieving Social Inclusion

Maxwell Peprah Opoku, Beatrice Atim Alupo, Naomi Gyamfi, Lois Odame, Wisdom Kwadwo Mprah, Eric Lawer Torgbenu, Badu Eric, Eds.: Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development Journal (DCIDJ), (2017)


There are social and environmental barriers faced by persons with disabilities which have been reported in literature. In discussing these barriers, attention is yet to be given to the support from families to members with disabilities. This study aimed to examine family support and its impact on the lives of persons with disabilities in Ghana.
http://dcidj.org/article/download/666/377


Barriers to Healthcare Services for People with Disabilities in Developing Countries: A Literature Review

Judith Baart & Florence Taaka, Eds.: Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development Journal (DCIDJ), (2017)


Purpose: This literature review aimed to identify the main barriers in access to mainstream healthcare services for people with disabilities. Method: Online databases were searched for relevant articles published after 2006. Preference was given to articles pertaining to developing countries. On the basis of pre-determined inclusion and exclusion criteria, 16 articles were selected for the review. Barriers noted in the articles were grouped thematically. Results: There appeared to be 7 main barriers - 4 related to the demand side i.e., pertaining to the individual seeking healthcare services, and 3 barriers on the supply side i.e., pertaining to healthcare provision. These are: 1) Lack of information; 2) Additional costs of healthcare; 3) Limited mobility; and 4) Stigmatisation, on the demand side; while on the supply side, 5) Staff attitude; 6) Communication barriers; and, 7) Inaccessible facilities. Conclusion: To ensure that people with disabilities can successfully access the necessary health services, the barriers on the demand side (the individuals requiring healthcare) as well as the barriers that are part of the healthcare system, should be attended to.
http://dcidj.org/article/download/656/376


Community Action Research in Disability (CARD): An Inclusive Research Programme in Uganda

Sally Hartley, Aisha Yousafzai, Maria Goretti Kaahwa, Harry Finkenflugel, Angie Wade, Janet Seeley, Maria de Lourdes Drachler, George Bazirake, Yasmine Alavi, Eric Mucurnguzi, Nyamutale Winifred Mataze, Eds.: Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development Journal (DCIDJ), (2017)


The ideology of Emancipatory Disability Research (EDR) reflected in the phrase ‘Nothing about us without us’, was first put forward in the 1990s. Although it aimed to place research control in the hands of the ‘researched’, i.e., people with disability, this rarely happens even today, 25 years later. The Community Action Research on Disability (CARD) programme in Uganda embraced and modified the EDR approach, recognising the need for including people with disability in the research process from concept to outcome, and nurturing participation and collaboration between all the stakeholders in achieving action-based research. The research teams always included people with disability and staff from Disability People’s Organisations (DPOs) as well as academics and service providers. It endeavoured to generate and carry out research around issues that mattered to people with disability and their families. Leadership roles were assigned by team members. The objectives of the CARD programme were: (1) to fund teams to carry out action-based research on disability in Uganda; (2) to develop research and administrative capacity to manage the initiative within the academic registrar’s office at Kyambogo University; (3) to incorporate new knowledge generated from the studies into the ongoing local community-based rehabilitation and special education courses; and, (4) to ensure wide dissemination of research findings to all stakeholder groups. CARD ran for 5 years, commissioning 21 action research studies in the field of disability and community-based services. This paper describes the process, presents the 12 completed studies, examines the extent to which the objectives were achieved and evaluates the experiences of the participating research teams, particularly in relation to the inclusion of its members with disability. It concludes with recommendations for future initiatives designed to promote validity, good value and inclusive approaches in disability research.
http://dcidj.org/article/download/630/347


An Evaluative Study of Services Provided in Community-Based Rehabilitation Centres in Jordan

Wesam B Darawsheh, (2017)


Purpose: This research study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of the services provided by CBR programmes in Jordan. Method: This was a mixed- methods investigation. A survey was carried out with 47 participants (stakeholders and volunteers) from four CBR centres in Jordan. It comprised 18 questions that collected both qualitative and quantitative data with both closed- and open-ended questions. The quantitative data were analysed using SPSS Version 22.0. Qualitative data were analysed through thematic content analysis and open coding to identify emergent themes. Results: 40.4% of the participants evaluated the effectiveness of CBR services as low. This mainly stemmed from the lack of efforts to increase the local community’s knowledge about CBR, disability and the role of CBR programmes towards people with disabilities. Conclusions: A proposal was offered concerning the priorities of CBR programmes in Jordan. Efforts need to be directed at promoting livelihood and empowerment components in order to actualise the principles of CBR, mainly by promoting multispectral collaboration as a way of operation. Implications: This study was inclusive of all types of disability. Barriers to the effectiveness of services may stem from accessibility issues to the families of persons with disabilities (hard to reach) or from CBR services themselves (hard to access). The culturally specific evaluative tool in this study was of “good” specificity and sensitivity, this evaluative instrument can be transferrable to measure the impact of CBR programmes in other settings.
http://dcidj.org/article/download/641/375


CBR Indicators: Pick and Choose what fits your Purpose

Johan Velema & Huib Cornielje, Eds.: Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development Journal (DCIDJ), (2016)


Indicators are a representation of reality. They are just numbers on a piece of paper or on a computer screen, but they stand for something far greater – the success of your project. Indicators are usually defined in the context of project planning and show something about or give an indication of progress towards realising the project goal, without being complete or comprehensive. Of course, there could be other representations of this reality, such as stories (Dart and Davies, 2003) or drawings (Feuerstein, 1986) or photographs (Tijm et al, 2011). However, indicators are a widely accepted way of representing what is being achieved in a programme or project.
http://dcidj.org/article/download/524/284


Community-Based Rehabilitation Services in Low and Middle-Income Countries in the Asia-Pacific Region: Successes and Challenges in the Implementation of the CBR Matrix

Roi Dennis Adela Cayetano &Jeananne Elkins, Eds.: Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development Journal (DCIDJ), (2016)


Purpose: This literature review aims to explore the importance of physical therapy services and the increasing awareness of CBR, specifically related to challenges in its implementation in low and middle-income countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Method: A literature review of multiple databases was conducted to locate relevant articles written within the past five years. The databases used for the search were Google Scholar, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and PubMed. Results: Thirteen articles about CBR were included in the literature review. These consist of studies on the quality of life, access to healthcare services, and barriers to CBR, as well as about the impact of CBR to LMICs and stakeholders. The articles demonstrate the vast potential of CBR, especially in LMICs in the A sia-Pacific region, with a significant positive impact on the lives of people with disabilities. Conclusion: CBR has improved the quality of life, access to medical services, functional independence, autonomy, community inclusion, and empowerment of people with disabilities in LMICs in the Asia-Pacific region. However, challenges in the implementation of CBR remain. These include lack of awareness and understanding of CBR, and physical, environmental, socio-economical and personal barriers.
http://dcidj.org/article/download/542/298


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