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Getting the Message Across

UNESCO's International Programme for the Development of Communication (IPDC), (2019)


Reporting on Climate Change and Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific: A Handbook for Journalists. UNESCO Series on Journalism education. It explores the essential aspects of climate change, including its injustices to vulnerable communities, especially women and girls and least developed countries, and provides examples of best practices and stories of hope unique to the region. It can be used as a resource for journalists to understand the science of climate change, as well as helping journalists to improve their reporting of the environmental, social, economic, political, technological and other angles of the story
https://en.unesco.org/sites/default/files/getting_...


Getting the Message Across. Thai Version

UNESCO's International Programme for the Development of Communication (IPDC), (2019)


สื่อ “สาร” ให้เข้าถึง : คู่มือนักข่าวส าหรับการรายงานเกี่ยวกับการเปลี่ยนแปลงสภาพภูมิอากาศและการพัฒนาอย่างยั่งยืนในภูมิภาคเอเชียและแปซิฟิก A new, free handbook, for journalists reporting climate change in Asia and the Pacific It explores the essential aspects of climate change, including its injustices to vulnerable communities, especially women and girls and least developed countries, and provides examples of best practices and stories of hope unique to the region. It can be used as a resource for journalists to understand the science of climate change, as well as helping journalists to improve their reporting of the environmental, social, economic, political, technological and other angles of the story.
https://bangkok.unesco.org/content/getting-message...


WMO Statement on the State of the Global Climate in 2018

World Meteorological Organization, (2019)


The 2019 edition treating data for 2018 marks sustained international efforts dedicated to reporting on, analysing and understanding the year-to-year variations and long-term trends of a changing climate.
https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/re...


Atlas of Health and Climate

World Health Organization WHO, Eds.: Word Health Organization, (2012)


The Atlas of health and climate is a product of this unique collaboration between the meteorological and public health communities. It provides sound scientific information on the connections between weather and climate and major health challenges. These range from diseases of poverty to emergencies arising from extreme weather events and disease outbreaks. They also include environmental degradation, the increasing prevalence of noncommunicable diseases and the universal trend of demographic ageing.
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/76224/5/9...


COP24 special report: health and climate change

World Health Organization WHO, (2018)


Exposure to air pollution causes 7 million deaths worldwide every year and costs an estimated US$ 5.11 trillion in welfare losses globally. In the 15 countries that emit the most greenhouse gas emissions, the health impacts of air pollution are estimated to cost more than 4% of their GDP. Actions to meet the Paris goals would cost around 1% of global GDP. The report provides recommendations for governments on how to maximize the health benefits of tackling climate change and avoid the worst health impacts of this global challenge. It describes how countries around the world are now taking action to protect lives from the impacts of climate change – but that the scale of support remains woefully inadequate, particularly for the small island developing states, and least developed countries. Only approximately 0.5% of multilateral climate funds dispersed for climate change adaptation have been allocated to health projects
https://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/276405


NO PLACE TO CALL HOME. Protecting children´s rights when the changing climate forces them to flee. For every child in danger.

UNICEF, Eds.: UNICEF, (2015)


Around the world, approximately 1 in 45 children are on the move – nearly 50 million boys and girls that have migrated across borders or been forcibly displaced within their own countries.1 Climate-related events and their impacts are already contributing significantly to these staggering numbers, with 14.7 million people facing new internal displacement as a result of weather-related disasters in 2015 alone. The annual average since 2008 is higher still, at 21.5 million, equivalent to almost 2,500 people being displaced every single day.2
https://www.unicef.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/...


Air pollution and child health: prescribing clean air

World Health Organization, (2018)


This report summarizes the latest scientific knowledge on the links between exposure to air pollution and adverse health effects in children. It is intended to inform and motivate individual and collective action by health care professionals to prevent damage to children’s health from exposure to air pollution. Air pollution is a major environmental health threat. Exposure to fine particles in both the ambient environment and in the household causes about seven million premature deaths each year. Ambient air pollution (AAP) alone imposes enormous costs on the global economy, amounting to more than US$ 5 trillion in total welfare losses in 2013.
http://www.who.int/ceh/publications/Advance-copy-O...


Green Climate Fund Proposal Toolkit 2017: Toolkit to develop a project proposal for the GCF

Fayolle, Virginie; Odianose, Serena, Eds.: Acclimatise, Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), (2017)


The GCF aims to support developing countries in achieving a paradigm shift to low-emission and climate-resilient pathways. This is achieved by funding innovative and transformative lowemission (mitigation) and climate-resilient (adaptation) projects and programmes developed by the public and private sectors to contribute to the implementation of national climate change priorities in developing countries. While it is relatively easy to tell what a mitigation project or programme is (i.e. its contribution to the reduction of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and/or whether it increases the capacity of an ecosystem to absorb them), the blurred line between a general development project and an adaptation project has been a contentious issue in the international climate finance debate. The relevant question is not whether a project is (also) a development project, but whether the project contributes to adaptation (i.e. what the adaptation/additionality argument is).
This toolkit helps governments and project developers understand how to fulfil the Green Climate Fund’s requirements when developing a fully-fledged funding proposal.
http://www.acclimatise.uk.com/wp-content/uploads/2...


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