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Severe Acute Malnutrition Update: Current WHO Guidelines and the WHO Essential Medicine List for Children

Williams, Phoebe CM.; Berkley, James A., (2016)


This document was prepared in response to a need to review and potentially update the current recommendations for the antibiotic treatment of both inpatient and outpatient management of severe acute malnutrition (SAM). The current recommendations (Table 1) are based on guidelines published in 2013 in the WHO Pocketbook for Hospital Care for Children, and the 2013 update on SAM (outpatient management). The global threat of increasing antimicrobial resistance and new data on efficacy and safety profiles requires a re-review of the current evidence to ensure recommendations are the most appropriate. The evidence base for the use of antibiotics in children presenting with uncomplicated SAM has been recently enlarged.
http://www.who.int/selection_medicines/committees/...


Management of Severe Acute Malnutrition in children: Working towards results at scale

United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), (2015)


The objectives of this guidance document are to:
1. Strengthen the capacity of country teams to effectively scale up and manage programmes to address severe acute malnutrition
2. Extend the geographic reach of quality treatment for SAM to all vulnerable communities in need
3. Maximize access to appropriate and quality treatment for SAM among all eligible children in the community at all times
4. Aid the formulation and implementation of national policies and strategies that support objectives 1 to 3
5. Aid the creation of an enabling environment that supports objectives 1 to 3 through advocacy, documentation of successful practices, support for operational research, mobilization of resources and collaboration with partners
https://childrenandaids.org/sites/default/files/20...


Situation Analysis of Children with Disabilities in Myanmar

UNICEF Myanmar, (2016)


The study analyses the current situation of children with disabilities in relation to realizing their rights and accessing basic services, as well as their life experiences in their communities. It also focuses on identifying the barriers created by society that prevent children with disabilities from enjoying their human rights. This includes identifying negative attitudes; environmental and communication barriers; gaps in policies or their effective implementation.
The report reveals that children with disabilities in Myanmar are less likely to access services in health or education; rarely have their voices heard in society; and face daily discrimination as objects of pity. It also highlights how inadequate policies and legislation contribute to the challenges these children face.
The information available in this publication should be useful for policy makers, development partners and Disabled Persons Organisations to promote the realization of the rights of all children with disabilities.
https://www.unicef.org/myanmar/Full_report_in_Engl...


WHO recommendations on newborn health: Guidelines approved by the WHO Guidelines Review Committee

World Health Organization (WHO), (2017)


Updated May 2017
This document is meant to respond to the questions:
■ What health interventions should be the newborn and young infants < 2 months of age receive and when should s/he receive it?
■ What health behaviours should a mother/caregiver practise (or not practise)?
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/25...


WHO recommendations on child health: Guidelines approved by the WHO Guidelines Review Committee

World Health Organization (WHO), (2017)


Updated May 2017
This document is meant to respond to the questions:
■ What health interventions should the child receive and when should s/he receive it?
■ What health behaviours should a mother/caregiver practise (or not practise)?
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/25...


Amuse-toi bien! Fais attention!

Organisation mondiale de la Santé (OMS), Fonds des Nations Unies pour l’enfance (UNICEF), (2008)


Complément au Rapport mondial sur la prévention des traumatismes chez les enfants 2008
http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/chil...


Have Fun, Be Safe!

World Health Organization (WHO), UNICEF, (2008)


Companion to the World Report on Child Injury Prevention 2008
This child-friendly version of the World report on child injury prevention aims to inform children, aged 7 - 11 years, about various types of injuries and how these may be prevented by using a mixture of facts, puzzles, games and other visual material.
Original file: 24 MB
http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/chil...


World report on child injury prevention

World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), Eds.: Peden, Margie et al., (2008)


Every year, around 830 000 children die from unintentional or "accidental" injuries. The vast majority of these injuries occur in low-income and middle-income countries. However, dozens of prevention strategies and programmes exist. If they were integrated into other child survival programmes and implemented on a larger scale, many of these deaths and much of the injury-related disability could be prevented.
The report documents the magnitude, risks and prevention measures for child injuries globally –particularly for drowning, burns, road traffic injuries, falls and poisoning.
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/43...


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