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Safe & sound: What states can do to ensure respect for the best interests of unaccompanied and separated children in Europe

UNHCR/IOM, Eds.: UNICEF, (2014)


Unaccompanied and separated children leave their countries of origin for a variety of reasons. They may be fleeing from persecution, armed conflict, exploitation or poverty. They may have been sent by members of their family or decided to leave on their own – be it to ensure their survival, or to obtain an education or employment. They may have been separated from their family during flight or may be trying to join parents or other family members. Or they may have become victims of trafficking. Often it is a combination of factors.
https://resourcecentre.savethechildren.net/library...


Standard operating procedure for care and protection of children in street situations

Save the Children, (2017)


India | The ‘Standard Operating Procedures for Care, Protection and Rehabilitation of Children in Street Situations’, is a unique endeavour to streamline the processes and interventions regarding Children in Street Situations, based on the prevailing legal and policy framework.
https://www.savethechildren.in/sci-in/files/b9/b96...


Birth defects surveillance: Atlas of selected congenital anomalies

World Health Organization (WHO), National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research (ICBDSR), (2014)


It provides selected illustrations and photographs of congenital anomalies that are severe enough to have a high probability of being captured during the first few days following birth
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/127941/1/...


Air pollution and child health: prescribing clean air

World Health Organization, (2018)


This report summarizes the latest scientific knowledge on the links between exposure to air pollution and adverse health effects in children. It is intended to inform and motivate individual and collective action by health care professionals to prevent damage to children’s health from exposure to air pollution. Air pollution is a major environmental health threat. Exposure to fine particles in both the ambient environment and in the household causes about seven million premature deaths each year. Ambient air pollution (AAP) alone imposes enormous costs on the global economy, amounting to more than US$ 5 trillion in total welfare losses in 2013.
http://www.who.int/ceh/publications/Advance-copy-O...


WHO recommendations on home-based records for maternal, newborn and child health

World Health Organization WHO, (2018)


The primary audience for the guideline is policy makers and health programme managers of MNCH and immunization programmes in ministries of health where decisions are made and policies created on the use and implementation of homebased records. The guideline is also aimed at health providers who use home-based records as a tool for recording information and providing health education or communicating key information. Development and international agencies and non-governmental organizations that support the implementation of home-based records will also find this guideline of use.
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/27...


Integrating palliative care and symptom relief into paediatrics: a WHO guide for health-care planners, implementers and managers

World Health Organization WHO, (2018)


People younger than 20 years comprise 35% of the global population and 40% of the global population of least-developed nations. The number of children - neonates, infants, children, and adolescents up to 19 years of age - who need pediatric palliative care (PPC) each year may be as high as 21 million. Another study found that almost 2.5 million children die each year with serious health related suffering and that more than 98% of these children are in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) (3). While estimates differ, there is no doubt that there is an enormous need for prevention and relief of suffering among children - for PPC.
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/27...


Levels and Trends in Child Mortality 2018

L. Hug, D. Sharrow, Kai Zhong, et al., Eds.: United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UN IGME); WHO; UNICEF, (2018)


The report finds that most children under 5 die from preventable or treatable causes like complications during birth, pneumonia, diarrhoea, neonatal sepsis and malaria. On average, under-five mortality rates among children in rural areas are 50 per cent higher than children in urban areas. By comparison, for children 5 to 14 years old, injuries become a more prominent cause of death, especially from drowning and road traffic injuries. Within this age group, the risk of dying for a child from sub-Saharan Africa is 15 times higher than in Europe
https://data.unicef.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09...


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